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Glitter Balloons

These "glitter"-adorned balloons can add a touch of elegance and glamor to any function. They may look expensive (for a balloon anyway), but the good news is it's easy to re-create the popular trend for yourself.

Adding the Sparkle

All you need is soft, ultra thin foil confetti (make sure to avoid pointed or hard confetti), hi-float, balloons and helium. If you just want to add color, but don't necessarily want the glittery look, you can use any paper-based confetti, such as shredded tissue paper.

The steps are as follows: pump hi-float into balloon, massage balloon to evenly coat the side of the balloon with product, pour confetti into the balloon, inflate, shake or whirl the balloon around to disperse the confetti and enjoy!

One benefit of using hi-float to add "glitter" to balloons is that it will lengthen the float life of the balloon. After all, if you go through the trouble of creating custom balloons, why not enjoy them longer? The second benefit is that it will act as an adhesive agent and bind the glitter to the balloon.

Watch the videos below for a simple demonstration:





Video Credits:
HI FLOAT Special Effects Confetti Balloons, courtesy of HIFLOAT Balloon
How to Make Glitter Balloons! Easy and Inexpensive Party Balloons!, courtesy of Bluegraygal

Disclaimer: Videos presented are not owned by Helium Xpress Balloon Wholesale and we do not assume any ownership. Additionally, we do not condone any actions, beliefs or views projected by any personality or organization within the videos or owners' channels.



Written by: Miriam E. Medellin



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