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How Much is Enough?

If you've ever asked this question, you're not alone. The amount of helium needed to complete a job is sometimes difficult to determine. We provide a small chart on our website to guide customers toward the appropriate amount of helium. However, this chart assumes that all balloons being inflated are the same size.

When you're dealing with a combination of different sizes of latex and foil balloons, you need more specific information. Thankfully, Qualatex has provided a chart which lists the helium capacity of most sizes and types of balloons. It's a great resource that makes calculating exactly how much helium is needed much easier. Next time you're inflating a wide variety of balloons, simply refer to this guide: Qualatex Helium Chart

Remember that overinflating or underinflating will adjust the numbers shown. Ensuring you have some extra helium is always wise. Give yourself some wiggle room and consider popped balloons, as well as discrepancies in size.

How to Use the Chart: Quick Guide

  1. Search the left side of the chart (Balloon type) and locate the size and type of balloon that most closely matches what you're using.
  2. The next column, "Inflated", gives you the size of the balloon when inflated. Make sure the inflated size is the same size you intend to inflate the balloon to. It's important to note that all other information listed for that balloon will be based on the inflated size. For example, if you're looking up the helium capacity for an 11" standard latex balloon, the 0.5 cu. ft. listed only reflects the capacity for the balloon when inflated to 11 inches.
  3. Lift ability is helpful if you work with several balloons (or large balloons) and balloon weights. It is, quite simply, how much weight the specific balloon can lift. Make sure the balloon weights used weigh more than the sum of your balloons' lift ability!
  4. Once you've found the right balloon type, you're ready for some basic math! Take a look at the capacity listed. Simply multiply that number by the number of balloons you want to inflate. And now you know how many cubic feet you need! Of course, if you have several types of balloons, then you'll need to repeat the process and add up the figures you come up with along the way. Once you have your total, you'll be able to select the cylinder size which contains the most appropriate amount of helium for you.

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