Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from 2015

The Miniloon

Balloons come in a variety of shapes and sizes. And for the sake of making a grand gesture, most people like to give and decorate with larger size balloons. It's a valid reason and they do make quite an impression, but 'miniloons' can be just as dramatic and, in some cases, more suitable.

What are 'miniloons'? In short, they're small foil balloons. Their sizes are usually described as 2", 4", 9" or 14", but there are many variations in between. One of the things that sets them apart from other balloons is that they are not intended for use with helium. Instead, they are to be inflated with air or nitrogen. As a result, these balloons will not float. While some may not be particularly fond of this, it does present some other notable advantages.
If you're decorating outside, you may find that larger helium balloons (foil or latex) will move around quite a bit, particularly on windy days. Depending on the placement of the balloon arrangemen…

Baby, It's Cold Outside!

Okay, maybe it's not cold yet, but it's certainly less hot! And on some particularly cool mornings, we'll be seeing an interesting effect on balloons. At the risk of sounding a little too scientific, let's explain.

The ScienceIn short, balloons will appear to shrivel up in the cold while they tend to expand in the heat. The reason is due to a density change of the molecules. (We warned you things may get a little scientific!) Cold weather makes the molecules more dense, which causes them to move around more slowly and within a smaller space. Because latex balloons are elastic, they will appear to "shrink" in extreme cold as the latex gives way to the smaller area of movement within. Foil balloons do not have the elasticity latex balloons do, but will appear to shrivel up as the foil around the unused space crinkles upon itself. As you can probably already guess, heat has the opposite effect. In this case, the molecules become less dense and begin to move arou…

Happy Halloween!

We are officially in the party season! In addition to the usual events and special occasions, we have back to back holidays to look forward to. Since everyone is gearing up for Halloween by looking for the perfect costume, buying candy and Halloween decorations, we thought to join in and help out. Over the past few weeks, we've come across a lot of great decorating ideas around the web, many of which we've shared on our various social media sites. If you're looking for food and drink ideas though, then keep reading. We've scoured the web and now we're sharing some of our findings with you. Scary Good Food. Halloween is known for being a "sweet" holiday (mostly because of the candy routine), but you can have savory foods at a Halloween gathering. Instead of giving everyone a sugar rush, add some twists to your favorite foods.

Still want a pizza night? Go for it! Pizza may not look spooky or seem very original, but pair it with some of these Breadstick Broo…

Summer Efficiency Series: Part V

How many of you hate cutting ribbon? We know the feeling. It's tedious and takes a lot of time. Fortunately, we've found a way of doing this that really speeds up the process. Just recently, we had to inflate 350 latex balloons for a customer. That required us to cut 350 strands of curling ribbon. We had one person assigned to this task. That's because it can be done so fast that one person is all it takes. In fact, we put a timer to it and it took all of 11 minutes and 5 seconds. That's right. In hardly no time at all, 350 ribbons were cut - all the same length. Oh and those 350 ribbons consisted of three different colors, so that also includes the time it takes to change out the spools.

In our last installment of our five part efficiency series, we'd like to share this method with you all. It's a twist on the ribbon holder method of simply pulling on the ribbon from a stationary point, cutting at the length you need and repeating this step multiple times. Ins…

Summer Efficiency Series: Part IV

Have you ever found yourself in a situation where you have more things to do than time allows for? Yeah, we have too. When it comes to decorating with balloons, many people find there's a bit of a timing issue. You don't want to inflate too soon before the event because you need enough time to inflate them all. On the other hand, you don't want to inflate them too early and prevent the balloons from looking their best during the event. The best time to start decorating with balloons will always vary a little, depending on the quantity and size of the balloons used. If you're utilizing hi-float, this will also play an important factor.

The first step in deciding when to start your balloon filling is knowing how long it will take to inflate the balloons. You can then backtrack to determine a good time to start. The second step is knowing the float life of the balloons you're going to inflate so that you don't inflate too early. Read more about the float life of b…

Summer Efficiency Series: Part III

Planning is a crucial step in any gathering. We plan so many small details and sometimes overlook larger ones as a result. Besides knowing how many balloons you want for the effect and look you're going for (as well as what suits your venue), you'll also need to know how much helium you'll need.

If you own your own helium tank and know you have some leftover from a previous event, don't guess as to how much pressure you have. Some people may remember exactly how many balloons they inflated last time, but most of us probably won't. Plus, you'd have to take into consideration the sizes of the balloons inflated and if they were over or under-inflated. Now it's getting trickier. To avoid any guessing, we suggest making an investment in a balloon filler with a contents gauge and quick tie needle (also known as a disc hook). Spoiler alert: We'll discuss the benefit of the balloon tie disc in Part IV of our series.

Chances are you own a balloon filler valve…

Summer Efficiency Series: Part II

Centerpieces are a great way to accent and solidify any party theme. If you're an experienced decorator, you know that finding creative and relevant pieces is often easier said than done. Many times we have a vision or an idea of what we'd like to display, but our options in color, size, texture and price level sometimes take our ideas in a different direction. Sometimes this change is for better, but other times it's not and we have to make countless trips to return or exchange an item and find the perfect replacement. Because all this experimentation takes time, we'd like to introduce you to one item that won't take any time at all: the pull-string bow.
The pull-string bow is by no means new. In fact, florists have been using them for many years. They're available in almost any color and in different sizes to complement any arrangement or centerpiece. Of course, the most amazing part is that they assemble themselves. Unassembled, they look like flat pieces …

Summer Efficiency Series: Part I

Warmer weather makes way for more outdoor activities. These activities can include cookouts, birthday parties, graduations and summer luaus! Sometimes these gatherings can be quite large and you can find great deals on bulk party supplies. Other times, these parties are considerably smaller. Many packages of balloons contain 50 to 100 balloons and helium is typically bottled in large cylinders capable of inflating anywhere from 100-400 balloons! While that's great for large events, it's not the most cost-efficient option for smaller guest lists. We'd like to present you with a great, inexpensive option for small events, where just a pop of color is needed.

This disposable helium tank by Balloon Time is lightweight, portable and convenient for any small party! Packaged, this kit weighs in just under 10 pounds and includes helium and a spool of white ribbon to get you started! This tank of helium is capable of inflating approximately twenty 12" latex balloons. All yo…

Is Helium Dangerous?

That Funny Voice: Inhaling Helium Everyone knows the high-pitch voice that results from inhaling helium. Kids and adults alike have enjoyed this activity with many laughs. While it's all in good fun, inhaling helium can be dangerous. As we approach the summer months, kids' parties and events increase in number and there is more exposure to helium and balloons. However, it's important to keep certain things in mind as we want everyone to safely enjoy these party staples.

When inhaled, helium displaces the oxygen in our lungs. While inhaling helium from a balloon is generally non-threatening, it can be dangerous if too much is inhaled. Because you're losing oxygen with each inhalation, you may even begin to feel lightheaded. If you feel any lightheadedness or dizziness, stop immediately. People have fainted from this activity, which is why we strongly advise against it.

Unfortunately, there have been helium-related deaths when inhaled from a pressurized tank. Never inhal…

The Float Life of Helium Balloons

Customers always ask how long balloons last. This is sometimes difficult to answer as many variables can impact a balloon's float life. However, the answer is essential to party planning.

Helium-filled balloons float due to the simple fact that helium is lighter than air. Because latex balloons are porous, helium slowly seeps through the pores. As less helium is left in the balloon, the balloon decreases in size and simultaneously floats lower to the ground until there is no longer a sufficient amount to keep the balloon afloat. The typical indoor float life of 12" latex balloons is 10-12 hours. If outdoors, this float life can be expected to decrease by at least half.

Part of the reason a balloon doesn't float as long outdoors is due to temperature. The hotter it is, the more susceptible the balloon is to popping. In contrast, balloons typically contract in extreme cold, which decreases the size of the balloon.

Ceilings that are texturized or have abrasive surfaces can a…